FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

What is ACAC?

The A Cappella Advisory Council, or ACAC, is the governing body for a cappella auditions at Wash U. It is made up of representatives from each group, and together they work to organize auditions every fall. If you want to try out for one or more groups, you will need to understand how ACAC works, so be sure to visit their web page and follow them on Instagram.

​What if I get called back to more than one group?

Congratulations! You can go to as many callbacks as you like. After your callback(s), you'll fill out a preference card, where you'll rank each group that called you back. If more than one of the groups you list wants you as a member, the one you list higher will take you. Check out the ACAC website for more information.



Why should I choose the Stereotypes?

Every group excels in different ways and prioritizes different things - it's up to you to decide what's most important to you. If you want to learn what we prioritize and how we excel, check out the About Us page! We also have music on Spotify, Apple Music, and YouTube, and if you have any questions that you can't find an answer to, send us a DM on Instagram.



What are the Stereotypes doing this year?

We'll be producing two HUGE performances, one in the fall and one in the spring. We're planning to travel for performances and gigs around the Midwest during the fall, go on tour during winter break, and compete in the ICCA tournament in the spring!



Do I have to have singing experience?

Singing experience is not required! Shower singers are welcome, as are choir members and famous pop-stars. Our members' various musical backgrounds make our sound more unique!



Do I have to have dancing experience?

Dancing experience is also not required! If you do have visual performance experience, we love to see that! The Stereotypes choreograph at least a couple songs every semester, but even our most un-coordinated members (there are several) do just fine. We have a Visual Director position that focuses on the creative aspects of our performances.



What if I get nervous for auditions?

Nervous is good! Being nervous means that you care. We know that auditions can be scary, so we try to keep the atmosphere laid back. We really want you to do your best. If you're feeling really nervous when you walk through the door, just let us know and we may be able to help out. After all, we were in your shoes not too long ago!



Is there anything else I can do to improve my chances?

Practice! Make sure you're comfortable with every step of the auditions process. If you have any concerns on our side, let us know! Be enthusiastic about singing and music. Try to figure out what you can offer the group that no one else can, and let that show in your audition!



Can I audition to do VP only?

Unfortunately, no. We always perform a few songs without vocal percussion every year, so every member of the group must be able to sing in the block. However, if you are a crazy awesome beat-boxing machine, we ask that you still try out -- your singing may be better than you give yourself credit for!



How many people are you looking for?

There's never a definite number of members we're looking for, but we tend to take between three and five new members every year, and the total number of current Stereotypes usually hovers between 12 and 16.



What voice parts are you looking for?

No matter what they say, every group is always looking for low basses and high tenors. Other than that though, we're just looking for people whose voices and personalities blend with the group.



​Why are you called "The Stereotypes?"

The Stereotypes name was first used to combat the stereotype of "a cappella kids," and to give stereotypical a cappella a new face. More recently, the name has taken on an ironic meaning: it represents the group's diversity, be it of racial or ethnic background, religion, gender identity, personality, and of course, musical background. We embrace the fact that we're all so different, and we can all come together because we love to sing.



What kind of time commitment is the Stereotypes?

Typical weeks include three 2-hour rehearsals. We'll occasionally perform small gigs. Each year, we perform two large-scale concerts, so there's about one week each semester when you'll eat, breathe, and live the Stereotypes. Additionally, we have regular CD recording sessions, we compete in ICCA every other spring, and we go on tour every few years. Even though being a member of the Stereotypes is a significant time commitment, we carefully schedule our rehearsals and events to be mindful of our members' lives outside of the group. As any of us will tell you, the time we all spend together is absolutely worth it!